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Friday, August 26, 2016

Solar. Space & Geomagnetic Weather, part II

by Stephanie Osborn
http://www.stephanie-osborn.com




And part II of the Solar, Space & Geomagnetic Weather series has gone up on Sarah Hoyt's According to Hoyt blog, right here:
https://accordingtohoyt.com/2016/08/26/15490/

Feel free to leave comments here or there.

BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS:

The Weather Out There Is Frightful: Solar/Space Weather and What It Means to the Earth and You


Our Sun is an active star. It may even be a variable star. Sunspots, flares, coronal mass ejections, all are signs of its activity. What kind of effect does it have on Earth? Other than the occasional sunburn, could it be dangerous? Has it been dangerous in the past? What can we expect in the near future?

Click here to purchase.




Silver Falchion Award Winner:
Sherlock Holmes and the Mummy's Curse

Holmes and Watson. Two names forever linked by mystery and danger from the beginning. Within the first year of their friendship and while both are young men, Holmes and Watson are still finding their way in the world, with all the troubles that such young men usually have: Financial straits, troubles of the female persuasion, hazings, misunderstandings between friends, and more. Watson’s Afghan wounds are still tender, his health not yet fully recovered, and there can be no consideration of his beginning a new practice as yet. Holmes, in his turn, is still struggling to found the new profession of consulting detective. Not yet truly established in London, let alone with the reputations they will one day possess, they are between cases and at loose ends when Holmes' old professor of archaeology contacts him. Professor Willingham Whitesell makes an appeal to Holmes’ unusual skill set and a request. Holmes is to bring Watson to serve as the dig team’s physician and come to Egypt at once to translate hieroglyphics for his prestigious archaeological dig. There in the wilds of the Egyptian desert, plagued by heat, dust, drought and cobras, the team hopes to find the very first Pharaoh. Instead, they find something very different... 

Noted Author Stephanie Osborn (Creator of the Displaced Detective series) presents the first book in her Sherlock Holmes, Gentleman Aegis series – Sherlock Holmes and the Mummy’s Curse, the debut volume of Pro Se Productions’ Holmes Apocrypha imprint.

Click here to purchase.

~Stephanie Osborn
http://www.stephanie-osborn.com

5 comments:

Stephanie Osborn said...

Okay, I got a question over on According To Hoyt, and for some reason, WordPress is choking on the numbers in my answer, so I am going to post here and link it over there.

Stephanie Osborn said...

Donald Campbell's question was:
"What is the sense of ‘speed’ between solar wind, flares and CMEs? Light is 8 1/3 minutes, and CMEs being a plasma are certainly slower. Are flares speed of light?"

Stephanie Osborn said...

My answer is:

Solar flares pretty much effect us via x-rays, so yes, speed of light.

Which puts speeds at:

Solar flares: 300,000,000m/s (300,000km/s) (671,000,000mph)
Solar wind: 400,000-750,000m/s (400-750km/s) (895,000-1,680,000mph)
CMEs: 20,000-3,200,000m/s (20-3,200km/s) (45,000-7,158,000mph)

The reason for the huge variation on CME speeds is because, if a CME has been through very recently, it will have cleared out the interplanetary medium, resulting in highly-decreased resistance, and the subsequent CME will not be slowed down. (Think of it as interplanetary terminal velocity. If the "atmosphere" isn't there because it's been swept aside, the falling object will go much faster.) This is, in fact, what happened during the Carrington event: two very large CMEs were emitted within a couple days of each other, and the second one blasted through and slammed into Earth before the effects of the first even had time to completely die down.

Donald Campbell said...

Stephanie, Thanks! I could work with the text numbers, but somehow 0s and ,s are much easier to compare.

Stephanie Osborn said...

You're welcome, Donald! I'm sorry I couldn't figure out how to post it over on the WordPress site.

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